About Me

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I'm a glass-half-full type of girl. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, grave's disease and celiac disease in 2010 and life-altering allergies in 2013. I believe having a positive attitude is the only way to live with dis-ease. I also believe that life doesn't have to be PERFECT for it to be WONDERFUL. Dis-ease is expensive, so I live a frugal yet healthy lifestyle. This is just my blog; my day-to-day story.

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Diabetes Doomsday Prepper

As I was taking inventory of my diabetic supplies over the weekend, I realized I am a diabetic doomsday prepper. Or a hoarder. Take your pick. I added up my test strips and currently have approximately 850-900 strips. At my current testing rate of 9-10 times per day, this is about a 3 month supply.
This drawer is one of my diabetes drawers. It contains my Multiclix lancets, ketostix, glucagon kits, tape, different colored skins for my CGM and PDM (for Omnipod) because I like them to match my clothes, and every other diabetic supply you can think of.
This drawer is actually one of my bedside table drawers. I ran out of room in my other drawer. This one holds BD lancets 2-deep.
In the bedside table drawer right below the BD lancets, it is drawer. It carries all of my extra glucometers I've received in the two years I've had diabetes. I don't have test strips for most of them so they don't get used. I also store extra cords for my CGM here.
Finally, in my diabetes cube (the kind you can sit on), I discretely hide my Dexcom sensors and Omnipod equipment. I actually don't have extra supplies of those; I use up every single one by the time I'm eligible to reorder.
In the end, I counted 900 test strips (a 3-month supply for me), 3300 lancets, more Ketostix that I can imagine using before they expire. I might just have to start peeing on them every day just for fun. As you saw in my previous blog showing you my fridge, you saw my insulin supply in the bottom vegetable drawer. I've got a enough to last me a while. I stock up on items because I periodically go through financial phases where I can't afford to buy the equipment or supplies that I need, when I need them. So I like to have extras, "just in case." Also, you never know when an emergency is going to happen and you are going to need LOTS of supplies. Does anyone else stock up on any particular diabetes supplies? DO share if you do!!

11 comments:

  1. Hey guys I want to tell that if you are going to nay place then please take your diabetes supplies if you are a diabetic patient as I had a very bad experienced.

    diabetes testing supplies

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  2. I try to keep stocked up on Isaac's diabetes supplies also :) Thanks for sharing :)

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  3. Hi, my name is Preston. I'm a type 1 from Nashville. I found this blog entry by googling diabetes doomsday. I was watching Doomsday Preppers, and I was like how would I ever be able to survive? If this country ever came to a screeching halt, pharmacies would probably be looted completely dry in about 27 minutes. I wish I could come up with some kind of game plan, but I am at a loss!

    I like your blog BTW, going to start faithfully reading it.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Preston! Thanks for the great comment. I have to agree with you in regards to what could take place with pharmacies in the event of an emergency. Just stock up on as much insulin as you can afford- refill your prescriptions at the earliest date your insurance will allow, and also don't be afraid to ask either your diabetes educator or your physician for free insulin samples. They usually have loads and will gladly help you. And always, you can ask the DOC for help- someone always has extra of something that they might be able to help you out with!!

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  5. How do you plan on keeping your insulin refrigerated if there are serious long-term grid outages?

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  9. And now the 2017 update for long term insulin storage. It has now been found that injectable solutions of insulin can be frozen under certain conditions and maintained in the frozen state for prolonged periods of storage without deterioration, thawed for injection without alteration of physical, chemical or pharmaceutical properties, with maintenance of the efficacy of the time at which it was first frozen. The thawed solution can be injected at once, or can be kept for the period it would have been considered good at the time it was first frozen, i.e., the normal expiration period resumes at the point at which it was suspended. the drug insulin can be stored for an indefinite period of time without any loss of its physical, chemical or pharmaceutical characteristics. The drug solution is instantly frozen as, for example, in liquid nitrogen,
    Current practice and regulation prohibits freezing insulin because of physical and chemical deterioration, and the consequent loss of physiological activity, which occur during the freezing process. Such prohibitions have heretofore been wise and necessary and remain so if proper freezing technique is not employed since deteriorated insulin will not effectively arrest the diabetic condition, resulting in a coma or death. It has been found, however, that if the freezing process is sufficiently rapid, the deterioration which occurs under normal freezing processes does not occur, and the insulin retains its full potency and efficacy. In order to attain sufficient rapidity, the insulin, preferably in injectable form, i.e., a conventional injectable solution, and preferably packaged for sale, is subjected to extreme low temperatures until frozen. A convenient and relatively inexpensive technique is to immerse the solution in appropriate containers into a bath of liquid nitrogen, at a maximum temperature of about -320.4 F., until frozen, i.e., for at least about 3 to 3.5 seconds per cc. While a liquid nitrogen bath is a convenient and relatively inexpensive manner of attaining sufficient rapidity in the freezing process, any other mode of operation which will result in a comparably rapid freeze can be utilized.
    In essence, if you have a way to keep something frozen, insulin can be flash frozen via liquid nitrogen and stored indefinitely until needed. This does NOT include sticking it in your freezer to freeze it, it HAS to be flash frozen. The method has been tested and flash freezing methods have been given a patent as well. You can get liquid nitrogen from Amazon. Also note that the first patent for freezing insulin for long term storage was awarded in 1972. A fact drug manufacturers have neglected to mention in over 4 decades. If you store insulin, they lose money by it not expiring so easily.

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    Replies
    1. "Tested" was it shown effective over a long period of time--or just the 30 days cited in the patent? Also, can you show a link to liquid N from amazon?

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